FacebookTwitter
Green Bay's Largest Independent Bookstore.
Twelve Thousand New & Used Books.
Imagine Infinitely. Shop Locally.
EventsEvents

Gayle Rosengren

Saturday, May 3
12 pm at The Reader's Loft

Gayle Rosengren

Please join us for an afternoon with middle grade author
 Gayle Rosegren as she reads from her new book, 
"What the Moon Said."

Publisher's comment:

What the Moon Said is the story of 10 year-old Esther and her family and how their love makes good times better and bad times bearable during the Great Depression.
 
Their move from the big city of Chicago to a small ramshackle farm in Wisconsin is full of changes for Esther.  Some of them are good, like being able to have a dog at last.  But some of them are bad, like having to use an outhouse because there is no indoor plumbing!
 
Join Esther on her "great adventure" and find out if she ever earns the hug she yearns for from her mother.   Find out what Esther discovers about luck—good and bad—and about the superstitions so important to her mother.  Find out what the moon said.
 

A Light in the Ruins

Tuesday, May 13
6:00 pm at The Reader's Loft

A Light in the Ruins

Publisher's Comments:

From the New York Times bestselling author of Midwives and The Sandcastle Girls comes a spellbinding novel of love, despair, and revenge--set in war-ravaged Tuscany.

1943: Tucked away in the idyllic hills south of Florence, the Rosatis, an Italian family of noble lineage, believe that the walls of their ancient villa will keep them safe from the war raging across Europe. Eighteen-year-old Cristina spends her days swimming in the pool, playing with her young niece and nephew, and wandering aimlessly amid the estate's gardens and olive groves. But when two soldiers, a German and an Italian, arrive at the villa asking to see an ancient Etruscan burial site, the Rosatis' bucolic tranquility is shattered. A young German lieutenant begins to court Cristina, the Nazis descend upon the estate demanding hospitality, and what was once their sanctuary becomes their prison.

1955: Serafina Bettini, an investigator with the Florence police department, has her own demons. A beautiful woman, Serafina carefully hides her scars along with her haunting memories of the war. But when she is assigned to a gruesome new case--a serial killer targeting the Rosatis, murdering the remnants of the family one-by-one in cold blood--Serafina finds herself digging into a past that involves both the victims and her own tragic history.

Set against an exquisitely rendered Italian countryside, The Light in the Ruins unveils a breathtaking story of moral paradox, human frailty, and the mysterious ways of the heart.

Lynda Drews

Thursday, May 15
6:30 pm at The Reader's Loft

Lynda Drews

Please join us for an evening with Green Bay true crime/mystery author
Lynda Drews as she reads from her new novel, 
CIRCLE OF INNOCENCE.

Publisher's comment:

In Door County—the “Cape Cod” of Wisconsin—evil is lurking… 
As Detective Sydney Bernhardt jogs along the limestone cliff, high above the waters of Lake Michigan, she discovers a child-like body floating face down—arms spread—dark hair haloing the head—the power of each wave rhythmically butting it against the deadly wall. This suspicious death sparks Syd into action to uncover the truth behind the victim’s sexually confused past—and to reclaim Syd’s own life. But as she follows this complex trail through nature’s beauty, Syd unknowingly becomes both a confidante and prey for that evil.

“CIRCLE OF INNOCENCE excels in psychological depth and detail even as it exposes a community replete with secrets and hidden threats. Any who want a strong saga of abduction, murder, and evolving danger... with more than a touch of romantic possibility, will find Drews' novel fits the bill.” --Diane Donovan ~ Midwest Book Review
 
“Every shocking twist in CIRCLE OF INNOCENCE lands on the reader like waves on a Door County beach, as Drews explores the dark heart of a beautiful place.” 
--Brian Freeman, Bestselling Author of THE BONE HOUSE

Lynda’s first book, RUN AT DESTRUCTION: A True Fatal Love Triangle, is about the mysterious death of Lynda’s Green Bay running partner. True Crime author, Ann Rule, said it was “Wonderfully written… a must for True Crime readers.” Publisher’s Weekly said: “the author and victim’s shared moments, and Drews’ feelings of emptiness in the decades since, are remarkable.” 

Imagine Poetry Series

Thursday, May 29
6pm at The Reader's Loft

Imagine Poetry Series

We are happy to report the success of the Imagine Poetry Series!
This month we welcome Wisconsin Poet Laureate 
Bruce Dethlefsen.  
The 'mic' is - as always - open to the public.

Bruce Dethlefsen
, Wisconsin Poet Laureate (2011-2012), has two chapbooks, A Decent Reed and Something Near the Dance Floor, and two full-length  books, Breather, published by Fireweed Press, and Unexpected Shiny Things, published by Cowfeather Press. His newest book, published by Little Eagle Press in April, 2014, is Small Talk.  A retired educator and public library director, he lives in Westfield, Wisconsin.

Philomena

Tuesday, June 10
6:00 pm at The Reader's Loft

Philomena

Publisher's Comments:

A New York Times Bestseller

Now a major motion picture starring Judi Dench and Steve Coogan and nominated for four Academy Awards: the heartbreaking true story of an Irishwoman and the secret she kept for 50 years

When she became pregnant as a teenager in Ireland in 1952, Philomena Lee was sent to a convent to be looked after as a "fallen woman." Then the nuns took her baby from her and sold him, like thousands of others, to America for adoption. Fifty years later, Philomena decided to find him.

Meanwhile, on the other side of the Atlantic, Philomena's son was trying to find her. Renamed Michael Hess, he had become a leading lawyer in the first Bush administration, and he struggled to hide secrets that would jeopardize his career in the Republican Party and endanger his quest to find his mother.

A gripping expose told with novelistic intrigue, Philomena pulls back the curtain on the role of the Catholic Church in forced adoptions and on the love between a mother and son who endured a lifelong separation.

Run

Tuesday, July 8
6:00 pm at The Reader's Loft

Run

Publisher's Comments:

Since their mother's death, Tip and Teddy Doyle have been raised by their loving, possessive, and ambitious father. As the former mayor of Boston, Bernard Doyle wants to see his sons in politics, a dream the boys have never shared. But when an argument in a blinding New England snowstorm inadvertently causes an accident that involves a stranger and her child, all Bernard cares about is his ability to keep his children — all his children — safe.

My Family and Other Hazards: A Memoir

Tuesday, August 12
6pm at The Reader's Loft

My Family and Other Hazards: A Memoir

* June Melby will join the circle for this discussion.

Publisher's comments:

A funny, heartwarming memoir about saying goodbye to your childhood home, in this case a quirky, one-of-a-kind, family-run miniature golf course in the woods of Wisconsin.

When June Melby was ten years old, her parents decided on a whim to buy the miniature golf course in the small Wisconsin town where they vacationed every summer. Without any business experience or outside employees, the family sets out to open Tom Thumb Miniature Golf to the public. Naturally, there are bumps along the way. In "My Family and Other Hazards," Melby recreates all the squabbling, confusion, and ultimately triumph, of one family's quest to build something together, and brings to life the joys of one of America's favorite pastimes. In sharp, funny prose, we get the hazards that taunted players at each hole, and the dedication and hard work that went into each one's creation. All the familiar delights of summer are here--snowcones and popcorn and long days spent with people you love.

Melby's relationship with the course is love-hate from the beginning, given the summer's freedom it robs her of, but when her parents decide to sell the course years later, her panicked reaction surprises even her. Now an adult living in Hollywood, having flown the Midwest long ago, she flies back to the course to help run it before the sale goes through, wondering if she should try to stop it. As the clock ticks, she reflects on what the course meant to her both as a child and an adult, the simpler era that it represents, and the particular pains of losing your childhood home, even years after you've left it.

The Glass Castle: A Memoir

Tuesday, September 9
6pm at The Reader's Loft

The Glass Castle: A Memoir

Publisher's Comments:

Jeannette Walls grew up with parents whose ideals and stubborn nonconformity were both their curse and their salvation. Rex and Rose Mary Walls had four children. In the beginning, they lived like nomads, moving among Southwest desert towns, camping in the mountains. Rex was a charismatic, brilliant man who, when sober, captured his children's imagination, teaching them physics, geology, and above all, how to embrace life fearlessly. Rose Mary, who painted and wrote and couldn't stand the responsibility of providing for her family, called herself an "excitement addict." Cooking a meal that would be consumed in fifteen minutes had no appeal when she could make a painting that might last forever.

Later, when the money ran out, or the romance of the wandering life faded, the Walls retreated to the dismal West Virginia mining town--and the family--Rex Walls had done everything he could to escape. He drank. He stole the grocery money and disappeared for days. As the dysfunction of the family escalated, Jeannette and her brother and sisters had to fend for themselves, supporting one another as they weathered their parents' betrayals and, finally, found the resources and will to leave home.

What is so astonishing about Jeannette Walls is not just that she had the guts and tenacity and intelligence to get out, but that she describes her parents with such deep affection and generosity. Hers is a story of triumph against all odds, but also a tender, moving tale of unconditional love in a family that despite its profound flaws gave her the fiery determination to carve out a successful life on her own terms.

For two decades, Jeannette Walls hid her roots. Now she tells her own story.

Manuscript Found in Accra

Tuesday, October 14
6:00 pm at The Reader's Loft

Manuscript Found in Accra

Publisher's Comments:

The great wisdom of life is that we can be masters of the things that try to enslave us.

“There is nothing wrong with anxiety. Although we cannot control God’s time, it is part of the human condition to want to receive the thing we are waiting for as quickly as possible. Or to drive away whatever is causing fear. Anxiety was born in the very same moment as mankind. And since we will never be able to master it, we will have to learn to live with it — just as we have learned to live with storms."

1099. Jerusalem awaits the invasion of the crusaders who have surrounded the city’s gates. There, inside the ancient city’s walls, women and men of every age and faith have gathered to hear the wisdom of a mysterious man known only as the Copt.

As the wise man speaks of loyalty, fear, bravery and solitude, of love, sex, beauty and elegance, his words offer truth and guidance, and reveal the human values that have endured throughout time — then as now, his words reveal who we are, what we fear and what we hope for the future.

Orphan Doors

Tuesday, November 11
6:00 pm at The Reader's Loft

Orphan Doors

Publisher's Comments:

When Bea Seidl was a young girl growing up in the Fox River Valley in northeastern Wisconsin, she was abruptly chaperoned in a fancy new dress to a new life. Before she could hardly make sense of what was happening, she was the newest resident of St. Joseph's Orphanage in Green Bay, where stern nuns, rigid regimens, and scant tenderness defined her days. She emerged from eight years there hard of heart and spirit but soon embarked on a life journey to rediscover the meaning of family in ways she did not imagine possible.

Orphan Doors is Seidl's inspiring, poignant memoir of survival and personal strength that is certain to resonate with anyone who believes in the resiliency of the human heart. Both deeply felt and delightfully humorous, her firsthand account of an abusive home and abandonment charts her beginnings in a dysfunctional family to her own attempts as an adult to forge a family of her own, a desire at times met with tragedy and ultimately with profound joy. In 1942, Seidl was given over to St. Joseph's Orphanage, with no explanation as to why her mother Glenda lost custody of her and her siblings. Most traumatic for the author was the loss of her older sister, who had long served as her protector in their chaotic household. At the punitive hands of Sister Edythe and other sisters at the orphanage, young Beatrice was given little comfort, immersing herself in schoolwork. However, she eventually found a rewarding life for herself in her beautiful and tender husband, Ken. It was not too long before fate intervened and a young, widowed Beatrice had to find a new path to a fulfilling, family life- and even a way back to the Catholic Church as a gratifying vocation.

As Seidl rises above dark days and emotional isolation, Orphan Doors offers an uplifting story of hope, happiness, and a good dose of plain silliness. It's a heartfelt testament to love, reconnection, and the healing power of laughter.

The Art Forger

Tuesday, December 9
6:00 pm at The Reader's Loft

The Art Forger

Publisher's Comments:

On March 18, 1990, thirteen works of art worth today over $500 million were stolen from the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum in Boston. It remains the largest unsolved art heist in history, and Claire Roth, a struggling young artist, is about to discover that there’s more to this crime than meets the eye.

Claire makes her living reproducing famous works of art for a popular online retailer. Desperate to improve her situation, she lets herself be lured into a Faustian bargain with Aiden Markel, a powerful gallery owner. She agrees to forge a painting — one of the Degas masterpieces stolen from the Gardner Museum — in exchange for a one-woman show in his renowned gallery. But when the long-missing Degas painting — the one that had been hanging for one hundred years at the Gardner — is delivered to Claire’s studio, she begins to suspect that it may itself be a forgery.

Claire’s search for the truth about the painting’s origins leads her into a labyrinth of deceit where secrets hidden since the late nineteenth century may be the only evidence that can now save her life. B. A. Shapiro’s razor-sharp writing and rich plot twists make The Art Forger an absorbing literary thriller that treats us to three centuries of forgers, art thieves, and obsessive collectors. It’s a dazzling novel about seeing — and not seeing — the secrets that lie beneath the canvas.

                             

 

HOME | EVENTS | PHOTO GALLERY | STAFF REVIEWS | BEST SELLERS | BOOK GROUPS | SERVICES | ABOUT | CONTACT