FacebookTwitter
Green Bay's Largest Independent Bookstore.
Twelve Thousand New & Used Books.
Imagine Infinitely. Shop Locally.
EventsEvents

Nancy Sweetland

Thursday, November 6
6:30 pm at The Reader's Loft

Nancy Sweetland

A Reader's Loft Book Group Discussion


From Divine Garden Press:

A picture-perfect coastline provides the backdrop for The House on the Dunes, a sweet yet mysterious and shocking tale. Surprised by inheriting spectacular emeralds and a lavish home on Lake Michigan, Olivia Hobart is compelled to uncover the secrets of her late mother’s past. Ignoring the wishes of her controlling husband, Olivia temporarily separates herself from him and her disabled adult daughter to stay at the dunes house and search for the truth which has been concealed from her all her life.

Her pursuit for answers is a challenge of its own, but Olivia’s efforts are further complicated by dangerous incidents, proving that what she doesn’t know can hurt her. Could someone else lay claim to the missing emeralds? Is her nearest neighbor—the attractive grandson of the house’s original owner—romantically interested in her or only attempting to regain what he sees as his rightful estate? Is the house’s seemingly innocent caretaker really a pawn in this baffling plot?

With only the help of the clue her mother left for her to find, Olivia brings to light the small town affair that could cost her the only life she has ever known. 

Orphan Doors

Tuesday, November 11
6:00 pm at The Reader's Loft

Orphan Doors

A Reader's Loft Book Club Discussion

Publisher's Comments:

When Bea Seidl was a young girl growing up in the Fox River Valley in northeastern Wisconsin, she was abruptly chaperoned in a fancy new dress to a new life. Before she could hardly make sense of what was happening, she was the newest resident of St. Joseph's Orphanage in Green Bay, where stern nuns, rigid regimens, and scant tenderness defined her days. She emerged from eight years there hard of heart and spirit but soon embarked on a life journey to rediscover the meaning of family in ways she did not imagine possible.

Orphan Doors is Seidl's inspiring, poignant memoir of survival and personal strength that is certain to resonate with anyone who believes in the resiliency of the human heart. Both deeply felt and delightfully humorous, her firsthand account of an abusive home and abandonment charts her beginnings in a dysfunctional family to her own attempts as an adult to forge a family of her own, a desire at times met with tragedy and ultimately with profound joy. In 1942, Seidl was given over to St. Joseph's Orphanage, with no explanation as to why her mother Glenda lost custody of her and her siblings. Most traumatic for the author was the loss of her older sister, who had long served as her protector in their chaotic household. At the punitive hands of Sister Edythe and other sisters at the orphanage, young Beatrice was given little comfort, immersing herself in schoolwork. However, she eventually found a rewarding life for herself in her beautiful and tender husband, Ken. It was not too long before fate intervened and a young, widowed Beatrice had to find a new path to a fulfilling, family life- and even a way back to the Catholic Church as a gratifying vocation.

As Seidl rises above dark days and emotional isolation, Orphan Doors offers an uplifting story of hope, happiness, and a good dose of plain silliness. It's a heartfelt testament to love, reconnection, and the healing power of laughter.

Kevin J. Miyazaki

Wednesday, November 12
6:30 pm at The Reader's Loft

Kevin J. Miyazaki

Perimeter: A Contemporary Portrait of Lake Michigan
(Wisconsin Historical Society Press 2014)

Commissioned by the Haggerty Museum of Art at Marquette University to create an artwork reflecting on the importance of freshwater, Milwaukee-based photographer Kevin J. Miyazaki embarked on a two-week, 1,800-mile drive around Lake Michigan. He traveled its perimeter, through Wisconsin, Illinois, Indiana, and Michigan, to produce what he calls "a contemporary portrait of Lake Michigan." Miyazaki set up his portable studio on beaches, in parks, on boat docks, and in backyards, photographing those he met along the way. From residents, environmental scientists, and artists to a Native American water rights advocate, surfers, and commercial fishermen, Lake Michigan holds a powerful place in the life of each. Many shared their thoughts with him on why this body of water is important to all. Miyazaki also photographed the water as he went, creating waterscapes of the ever-changing lake affected by weather and time. Perimeter gathers these images together, creating a diverse portrait of both people and a place, encapsulating Lake Michigan's significance to those who are drawn to it.

Kevin J. Miyazaki is a Milwaukee-based editorial and fine art photographer. His work has appeared in such publications as Martha Stewart Living, Travel + Leisure, Midwest Living, and The New York Times Magazine. His series Camp Home, in which he documents the reuse of Japanese internment camp barracks from World War II, has been exhibited at the Photo Center NW and SOIL Gallery in Seattle, the RayKo Photo Center in San Francisco, the University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee, the Madison Museum of Contemporary Art, and the James Watrous Gallery in Madison. Miyazaki’s work can be seen at

An Evening with Nickolas Butler

Thursday, December 4
6:30 pm at The Reader's Loft

An Evening with Nickolas Butler

Nickolas Butler, author & winner of  the 2014 Midwest Independent Booksellers' Choice Award for Shotgun Lovesongs joins the Reader's Loft stage.

Shotgun Lovesongs is set in small-town Wisconsin, where the VFW serves as the meeting place for the young and old. The story weaves itself in and out of the lives of five friends who had forged a way out into the world, as most young people do, only to find themselves yearning for the familiar comfort of home.

Hank, Leland, Kip and Ronny were all born and raised in the same Wisconsin town—Little Wing—and are now coming into their own (or not) as husbands and fathers. One of them never left, still farming the family's land that's been tilled for generations. Others did leave, went farther afield to make good, with varying degrees of success; as a rock star, commodities trader, rodeo stud. And seamlessly woven into their patchwork is Beth, whose presence among them—both then and now—fuels the kind of passion one comes to expect of lovesongs and rivalries.

Seldom has the American heartland been so richly and accurately portrayed. Though the town may have changed, the one thing that hasn't is the beauty of the Wisconsin farmland, the lure of which, in Nickolas Butler’s hands, emerges as a vibrant character in the story.  Shotgun Lovesongs is that rare work of fiction that evokes a specific time and place yet movingly describes the universal human condition. It is, in short, a truly remarkable book—a novel that once read will never be forgotten.

Nickolas Butler’s “Shotgun Lovesongs” is a good old-­fashioned novel, a sure-footed and unabashedly sentimental first effort that deserves to be among the standouts in this year’s field of fiction debuts. - Jonathon Evison

Nickolas Butler was born in Allentown, Pennsylvania, raised in Eau Claire, Wisconsin and educated at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the University of Iowa Writer's Workshop. He is the author of the novel Shotgun Lovesongs and a forthcoming collection of short stories entitled, Beneath the Bonfire. Along the way, he has worked as: a Burger King maintenance man, a tutor, a telemarketer, a hot-dog vendor, an innkeeper (twice), an office manager, a coffee roaster, a liquor store clerk, and an author escort. His itinerant work includes: potato harvester, grape picker, and Christmas tree axe-man. His short stories, poetry, and non-fiction have appeared in: Ploughshares, The Kenyon Review Online, The Lumberyard, The Christian Science Monitor, Narrative, Sixth Finch, and several other publications.

He lives on sixteen acres of land in rural Wisconsin adjacent to a buffalo farm. He is married and has two children.



The Art Forger

Tuesday, December 9
6:00 pm at The Reader's Loft

The Art Forger

A Reader's Loft Book Club Discussion

Publisher's Comments:

On March 18, 1990, thirteen works of art worth today over $500 million were stolen from the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum in Boston. It remains the largest unsolved art heist in history, and Claire Roth, a struggling young artist, is about to discover that there’s more to this crime than meets the eye.

Claire makes her living reproducing famous works of art for a popular online retailer. Desperate to improve her situation, she lets herself be lured into a Faustian bargain with Aiden Markel, a powerful gallery owner. She agrees to forge a painting — one of the Degas masterpieces stolen from the Gardner Museum — in exchange for a one-woman show in his renowned gallery. But when the long-missing Degas painting — the one that had been hanging for one hundred years at the Gardner — is delivered to Claire’s studio, she begins to suspect that it may itself be a forgery.

Claire’s search for the truth about the painting’s origins leads her into a labyrinth of deceit where secrets hidden since the late nineteenth century may be the only evidence that can now save her life. B. A. Shapiro’s razor-sharp writing and rich plot twists make The Art Forger an absorbing literary thriller that treats us to three centuries of forgers, art thieves, and obsessive collectors. It’s a dazzling novel about seeing — and not seeing — the secrets that lie beneath the canvas.

Travis Dewitz

Thursday, December 18
6:30 pm at The Reader's Loft

Travis Dewitz

Blaze Orange: A Discussion with Travis Dewitz

From the book website:

Blaze Orange is a photographic coffee table book published through the Wisconsin Historical Society which is full of timeless images of the Whitetail Deer gun hunting season in Wisconsin. Wisconsin deer hunting is all about family. Families raise their children safely into the sport of hunting which is filled with traditions. Wisconsin’s Whitetail Deer gun season is 9 days long and requires hunters to wear Blaze Orange for safety. The season in closely monitored by the Wisconsin DNR. The DNR expects more than 600,000 hunters, about 10% of the state’s population, to take to the Wisconsin woods and fields next weekend. Wisconsin deer hunting runs deep with heritage for many Wisconsinites as the deer season here has an almost cult like following.

Tara Meissner

Thursday, January 15
6:30 pm at The Reader's Loft

Tara Meissner

Tara Meissner is a former journalist and a lifelong creative writer. She holds a Bachelor of Arts Degree and works part-time at her local library. Tara lives in Wisconsin with her husband, Mike, and their three sons. She writes longhand in composition notebooks. Stress Fracture: A Memoir of Psychosis is her first book. 


Stress Fracture: A Memoir of Psychosis 

This psychology memoir is about the things that break us and how we heal. It offers a raw view a 33-year-old wife and mother swallowed by psychosis. The psychotic episode includes meeting Jesus Christ, party palnning with Ellen DeGeneres, and narrowly escaping eternity in the underworld. 

Casually called a nervous breakdown, psychosis is an entrapment outside of self where hallucinations and delusions anchor. Family, doctors, and fellow patients witnessed a nonverbal, confused, distraught shell of a woman. In the security of a psychiatric care center, the week-long psychosis broke and spit out a bipolar patient in the cushioned place of middle class medicine. 

Outpatient recovery consumed the better part of a year with psychiatric treatment and spiritual contemplation. Left scarred and damaged, health returned allowing her to tentatively embrace a grace and peace earned through acceptance of bipolar disorder.

                             

 

HOME | EVENTS | PHOTO GALLERY | STAFF REVIEWS | BEST SELLERS | BOOK GROUPS | SERVICES | ABOUT | CONTACT